Don Asher
Don Asher, author of 12 books and numerous articles, travels the nation giving students and other job seekers tips on getting hired.

Job-search guru gives tips to students

September 14, 2010

Many students worry about how the job market will be when they graduate, especially given the current peevish economy.

The WVU College of Business and Economics Center for Career Development helped them think positively about job prospects recently with a talk by “America’s job-search guru,” Donald Asher.

The author of 12 books and numerous articles in new newspapers, journals and magazines, Asher travels the nation giving students and other job seekers tips on getting hired.

Asher said students can get ahead in the search for jobs if they remember one word: persistence.

“You have to commit a certain number of hours a week to your search. The national average number of hours per week that a person who has been unemployed for awhile looks for work is six hours a week,” he said.

That’s not enough, he told the students.  They should be on the job hunt for between 30 to 40 hours each week, he said.

He also emphasized meeting people and making connections. He told students that being volunteers can lead to jobs.

Rita R. Sailer, director of the WVU College of Business and Economics Center for Career Development, said looking for jobs can be daunting and that Asher’s talk was aimed at equipping students with the knowledge to be successful.

“The job search process has become more and more complex,” she said. “Particularly, once a job has been posted online, students are competing against hundreds, if not thousands, of other candidates.  We invited Don Asher, one of America's premier career consultants, to share tips and strategies with our students to help them navigate this process more successfully.  Don was especially effective in helping students understand how to uncover the hidden job market, how to network effectively, and to realize the potential of turning an internship into a permanent job.”

Asher has been the career columnist for USAirways Magazine, education columnist for MSN, and a contributing writer for the Wall Street Journal’s CareerJournal.com and CollegeJournal.com, among others.

He holds the master of human resources and organization development degree from the University of San Francisco, and a bachelor’s degree in philosophy-religion from Reed College.